Use Mono to Check Your Mix.

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You can choose 24 by checking the box in the Recording menu. There are a few different ways to go about it, and some are more efficient than others. The first way to import audio into Logic Pro X is to find the files in your Finder window, highlight them, and simply drag them into your session.

From here, a dialogue box will ask you whether you want to Create new tracks, Use existing tracks, or Place all files on one track. Another way to import files into Logic is to do so using the Import menu. If you select Audio File from the Import menu, a dialogue box will open allowing you to find the tracks for import. This is especially important the more tracks you have to mix!

Make a selection by clicking the first track and dragging to the last one. Listening to this will help you determine where things should begin to sit relative to one another. At this point you can get hands on and move faders! This is great for, say, a left and right rhythm guitar, or any other stereo pair of instruments. Lots of engineers recommend bringing all the tracks down to dB when starting a mix just to create headroom.

Panning instruments around the stereo field is usually the next step after setting basic levels. You can even get really creative with your placement of elements in the stereo field to add interest to your mixes! Balance is used for mono tracks where we have just a single audio signal. Stereo pan takes into account both channels of audio on your stereo tracks, which can be very useful on, say, a stereo recorded keyboard. Some more obvious panning moves are left and right rhythm guitars, panning overheads or other percussion left and right, etc.

There are two different ways to open up the Channel EQ in Logic. The first is to locate the Audio FX section of a channel and find EQ in the drop-down list of plugins. On either end are high- and low-pass filters, as well as high and low shelving EQs. Generally speaking, EQ should be used conservatively. If you find yourself making really drastic boosts or cuts to a signal, this is probably a sign something has gone wrong while recording.

Another general EQ tip is to boost frequencies with a broader Q, and cut frequencies with a narrower one. Even gentle filtering around 20 or 30 Hz on low-end instruments like kick drum and bass can carve out a ton of space in your mix!

Learning how to use a compressor is one of the most important mixing skills you can acquire. Compression is quite literally all over mixes, even becoming the sound we associate with loud, modern pop mixing. Ratio settings generally range from all the way to At , an input signal of 2 dB will output at 1 dB.

An input signal of 10 dB will output as 5 dB, and so on. At a ratio, your input signal is being reduced by a factor of 2. The ratio determines how much a sound is being reduced in volume, i. Any sound louder than dB will then tell the compressor to start applying gain reduction.

Threshold tells the compressor when to turn on, and ratio determines how much gain reduction to apply. Generally speaking, we use compression to catch the loudest peaks in our dynamic material. So, setting a threshold that catches and reduces those peaks to make our track level more consistent is the best way to begin.

But what exactly happens when the signal does surpass the threshold? Does gain reduction immediately kick in? Not necessarily. The attack setting controls how much time it takes the compressor to apply gain reduction after the input signal passes the threshold.

If we set the attack time to 5 ms, it will take 5 ms for gain reduction to apply after the input signal passes our dB threshold. Setting the attack time will vary from instrument to instrument, and even from song to song based on tempo and a variety of other factors. Most of the time, slower attack times work well; think somewhere between 20 and 40 ms. Ensure the Bypass Effects Plug-ins setting is disabled.

If it is enabled, the Gain plugin with mono mode enabled will be disabled. Converting a stereo track to mono in Logic Pro X is quick and easy process. If you have any questions, feel free to send me an email or reach out to me on Twitter. Enable mono mode in Logic Pro X’s Gain plugin. The sound no long has any stereo width. The visual meter shows identical peaks on both channels.

 
 

How to Convert a Stereo Track to Mono in Logic Pro X – Table of Contents

 
The added dimension of stereo can add a lot to a mix.

 

 

Sometimes mixing is a matter of hearing your music in a few different ways, to bring out any changes that need to be made. One of the simpler tricks to do this is to listen to your mix in mono toward the end of the mixing process. Most DAWs or mixing boards have a button to test your mix out in mono. When two tracks are in the same frequency range and out of phase with each other, it can cause a kind of audio signal interference called comb filtering. Comb filtering is a thin and weak sound in your mix.

By removing the added dimension of stereo, it helps to really identify any occurrences of interference. The added dimension of stereo can add a lot to a mix. Think of mono as your worst-case scenario. There are two different ways to open up the Channel EQ in Logic. The first is to locate the Audio FX section of a channel and find EQ in the drop-down list of plugins.

On either end are high- and low-pass filters, as well as high and low shelving EQs. Generally speaking, EQ should be used conservatively. If you find yourself making really drastic boosts or cuts to a signal, this is probably a sign something has gone wrong while recording. Another general EQ tip is to boost frequencies with a broader Q, and cut frequencies with a narrower one. Even gentle filtering around 20 or 30 Hz on low-end instruments like kick drum and bass can carve out a ton of space in your mix!

Learning how to use a compressor is one of the most important mixing skills you can acquire. Compression is quite literally all over mixes, even becoming the sound we associate with loud, modern pop mixing. Ratio settings generally range from all the way to At , an input signal of 2 dB will output at 1 dB. An input signal of 10 dB will output as 5 dB, and so on. At a ratio, your input signal is being reduced by a factor of 2. The ratio determines how much a sound is being reduced in volume, i.

Any sound louder than dB will then tell the compressor to start applying gain reduction. Threshold tells the compressor when to turn on, and ratio determines how much gain reduction to apply. Generally speaking, we use compression to catch the loudest peaks in our dynamic material.

So, setting a threshold that catches and reduces those peaks to make our track level more consistent is the best way to begin. But what exactly happens when the signal does surpass the threshold? Does gain reduction immediately kick in? Not necessarily. The attack setting controls how much time it takes the compressor to apply gain reduction after the input signal passes the threshold. If we set the attack time to 5 ms, it will take 5 ms for gain reduction to apply after the input signal passes our dB threshold.

Setting the attack time will vary from instrument to instrument, and even from song to song based on tempo and a variety of other factors.

Most of the time, slower attack times work well; think somewhere between 20 and 40 ms. A slow attack means the entire note will be compressed after it passes the threshold, rather than just the initial transient. If you want to crush fast transients, say on a snare of rapidly-picked guitar, fast attacks do the trick. Release is another time setting that determines how quickly the compressor turns off after the signal drops below the threshold.

Again, this is a very important setting that ultimately determines how the compression will sound. If the release is too quick, the audio will start to sound unnatural.

A good starting point is somewhere around 60 ms. Where you go from there will depend on the overall rhythmic feel and tempo of the song itself. A general rule of thumb is to increase the makeup gain until the level coming out is equal to the level going in. Or, you can push the makeup gain even more to get more overall level out of a track. Understanding compression basics will help you utilize it effectively on a variety of sound sources.

People like to use Studio FET style compression on things like kick, snare, vocals, and other instruments with lots of transients.

The best thing you can do is try out each of the 7 compressors and get to know which ones you like the most! Logic Pro X makes using reverb very simple, providing users with excellent stock reverb plugins as well as a number of awesome sounding presets. In Logic Pro X, simply open the mixer window, select which tracks you want to Send, and choose an available Buss.

Logic will automatically create a properly routed Aux Return for you! This volume knob determines how much signal is being sent to the Aux Return. Now you can load up an instance of ChromaVerb , which has really great chamber sound right out of the box.

 
 

Mono mixing logic pro x free

 
 
How can you add ambience to MIDI hi hats in Logic Pro X? When mixing my self-released songs should I mix them in mono or stereo? Browse ad‑free. The best mixes and masters tend to sound good on a broad spectrum of listening settings. One useful tip for balancing a track is to mix your music in mono. Open the plugin and click “mono.” mono button in logic pro x. It’s that simple! Different DAWs have different methods, though.

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